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The Importance of a Few Minutes

Mon, 12/31/2012 - 10:40am -- gabbyandlaird

I just started taking some spin classes at the studio where I take SPX Pilates, just to mix it up. Some of the clients who attend spin regularly also take Pilates, while others are new faces. After taking only a few cycle classes, I noticed that one woman consistently showed up late. And not just a minute or two late, either, but about 10 minutes late every. single. time. Since each class is only 40 minutes in duration, I was shocked. Did she not have any remorse over missing a quarter of the class for which she was paying? In addition, did she not realize she was missing a whopping quarter of what was most likely her entire scheduled workout for the day?

After the second time I witnessed her amble in a quarter of the way through class as if she was right on time, my instructor commented. We were well past our warm up and already deep into a set of hill work. The woman shrugged it off and muttered something like “at least it’s better than nothing”.

Is any workout better than no workout? Sure, we all have off days where just getting to the gym feels like a victory. But consider your own training. Do you constantly slack off the last few minutes of every workout with your personal trainer, going through the motions until you reach the finish? Do you lay down on your mat through the last few crucial asanas in your yoga class each week, skipping them completely and waiting for the teacher to ease you into shavasana? Did you plan to run 4 laps but walk the last half lap each time you hit the track? Those few minutes of each workout that you may not be giving your all could be the difference in seeing definition in your abs, shedding the last 5 pounds, or feeling outstanding instead of just good.

That day, I used this woman’s nonchalance after my instructor’s comment to motivate me to push harder. I pedaled faster, knowing that every moment on that bike mattered. Showing up may be the hardest part, but once we’re there, why not give it all we got?

By Contributing Editor Blair Atkins